SIMPLY BEING

Category: This-That (page 2 of 230)

Eyes of Love

“You know, I still think you are one of the handsomest guys I have ever seen.”

“Hmm, hmm.”

It’s true, it really is! I have been seeing his face for decades now, and I still find it strikingly handsome.

I find my father has an unusually kind/sweet face, and as for Mummy, well… her countenance reflects such sweet kindness, plus she has the most radiant skin ever. Not to mention my sister who is cuteness personified, even as she enters her 40s. And then there are my friends who are all beautiful, noble women.

I wonder if it’s at all possible to recognize Beauty unless viewed through the eyes of Love. Maybe it’s Love (love?) that sheds light on what is, or perhaps it is the one that blinds us from what is. I don’t know, and do I really care?

Habits

It’s an interesting phenomenon when a habit dissolves, and there is not another one to take its place. For instance, dinner used to be a habit, and now it’s poof… gone! A wide expanse of time has opened up in the evenings. No dinner, no cleanup… all this time, what is a person to do?

I love this quote by novelist Susan Ertz. “Millions long for immortality who don’t know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon.”

“I can’t function without my morning chai,” “I cannot end a meal without yogurt and rice,” “I cannot wear leather,” and so on. All habits, I think? And as I realized during recent travels, yes, I can function without morning chai, and yes, I just bought a leather purse!

I wonder if we define ourselves by these habits, and when they dissolve, we think we are dissolving, too. And prolly that’s why we hasten to find new ones. (Or perhaps, we are frightened of empty space and time.)

(I, for one, have a hard time developing new habits. No sooner do I make a resolution than I am plotting to break free of it!)

Inchoate

Perhaps, recognition of an object gives rise to a subject. An array of objects creates a field that encloses an idea (identity?), gives definition to the subject who is also enclosed within the field, just like the objects themselves. But the objects begin to disappear, one after the other… and the subject feels its edges beginning to blur. It’s a moment of mild panic, and there are fewer and fewer objects now showing up in the field.

What to do? Go to sleep?

“yathA drishti, tathA srishti,” and so, when I stop looking, they don’t show up. Or perhaps, they stop showing up and I stop looking. Or maybe it’s the same phenomenon. All I know is that I am losing the habit of looking, or maybe there is little interest (energy) poured into looking. And all this energy is pooling somewhere, or everywhere… sans object or objectivity or subject or subjectivity.

Expression/Experience

A few fleeting thoughts. (I see the irony, yes, I do!)

Expression can never hope to capture experience. In fact, it is wholly incapable of conveying experience, or maybe only a fraction of it. Here’s the clincher, though. Experience is fleeting, while expression has some degree of longevity. (Even if it’s only an individual voicing her thoughts to the void. And if she writes it out someplace, it persists longer… in her mind and in the minds of those who read it.) Here’s where expression does the individual disservice. It grants permanence to something ephemeral. It makes an experience into Truth, whereas what it is is creativity. It’s the mind connecting the dots, drawing a picture, casting a passing moment on to stone, paper, canvas, film.

If the individual and her readers (or listeners, etc.) know expression for what it is (i.e. creative energy), they can partake in it, savor it, bless it, or not. However, when they construe it as Truth, they grant it solidity, a lasting relevance. And they are forever imprisoned by it.