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An Examined Life

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Tag: vegan (page 1 of 6)

Scrawled Keepsakes/Parippu Pradaman

As a child (or a young adult), I never cooked. I did not know how to. I could rustle up a decent cup of instant coffee but that was it. Mummy tried her best to get me to help around the kitchen, maybe learn to cook a few basic things. But I wasn’t remotely interested. Mom, the smart and wise woman that she is, gave up on the obvious-to-be-wasted effort. Her thought? You will learn to cook when you need to.

How right she was. I had to cook when I arrived in the United States, a young and hopeful bride, hopelessly earnest and wondering/wandering. And so I learned. Longtime blog readers may recall some old posts where I described cooking a dal, that I thought was moong and ended up being masoor instead. I used to call Pinch at work asking him to troubleshoot “difficult” cooking situations. Ahh, those were the days.

I started maintaining a notebook of recipes I got from Mom. And that’s how I got hold of the Parippu Pradaman recipe.

Parippu Pradaman Recipe

This is a traditional Kerala dessert made from moong dal, jaggery and coconut milk. Yes, it is vegan. And it is ready in minutes, if you use canned coconut milk. You can fancify it with raisins and toasted cashews, if you like. I love the simple version, so here you go.

Need any further instructions, or will those four lines suffice? 🙂

Ingredients

3/4 cup moong dal
1/2 cup jaggery (or to taste)
2/3 cup canned coconut milk (full-fat)
powdered/crushed cardamom, dried ginger (optional)

Method

  • Roast moong dal in a pan until lightly toasted. Let it cool. Rinse with water a couple of times to wash off any dust, etc.
  • Cook moong dal in a pressure cooker.
  • Mash the cooked moong dal with the back of a spoon until it has a somewhat uniform consistency (no lumps).
  • Place jaggery in a pan. Add boiling water so you can mix the jaggery evenly. Cook on medium-low heat until the jaggery melts and turns syrupy.
  • Add moong dal to the jaggery syrup. Mix well.
  • Pour coconut milk into the moong dal-jaggery concoction. Stir well. Turn off the heat.
  • Sprinkle crushed cardamom and dried ginger on top. Serve warm or cold.

Parippu Pradaman

Notes

If you wish, you can add more (or less coconut milk), so as to get a medium-thick consistency. I think you might also be able to get away with using low-fat coconut milk but then you will miss the incredible creaminess of the preparation. 🙂

You can also vary the amount of jaggery you use, if you would like the dish to be more (or less) sweet.

Pantry and Freezer Clean-Out (Yay, Spiced Banana Loaf)

I cook lunch and dinner on most days.

P and I take lunch to work in Thermos containers that keep the food warm for hours. A long time ago (or so it seems), I used to cook extra for dinner, and we took the leftovers for lunch the following day. Then something changed (and I don’t recall what it is). I began cooking lunch every morning. We discovered that Thermos containers are true to their word. The steaming dal blew my mind (and P’s too). We were instant converts. Now I cannot fathom eating leftovers for lunch. There is clearly something to be said for the sheer deliciousness that is freshly cooked food. There is a certain juiciness to it, an indescribable rasa that renders the food sublime and delicious and utterly satisfying.

You’d think that a kitchen as heavily used as ours would see a high turnover of ingredients and supplies. That’s certainly true for some varieties of dals and beans, fresh produce, bread, avocados, dates (we seem to consume them in crazy quantities – I jest), etc. However, there are certain ingredients that lurk on pantry and freezer shelves for a long while. So I have decided to start using those “silent actors” and clear them out.

Made a delicious Spiced Banana Loaf yesterday. Proud to say that I cleaned out the following items for this endeavor – Spelt flour, almond meal, broken cashews. I also used white whole wheat flour that has been sitting in the freezer for a while now (I bake mostly with spelt flour).

This is a vegan recipe that uses coconut oil. I use the organic, unrefined type and it is fairly flavorless. The original recipe called for 1.5 cups of chocolate chips but I used a blend of cranberries, black raisins, cashews and cocoa nibs instead. Can I say, that mix is a whole lot more interesting than plain old chocolate chips?

Spiced Banana Loaf

The end result was (or is) moist, mildly sweet (I used a third of the quantity of sugar asked for in the original recipe), perfectly spiced. I couldn’t carve out neat slices, instead ending up with little misshapen slabs.

So, if you would like to sample these little bits of deliciousness, please stop by. I am a little shy to tote them out this time. 🙂

The original recipe is at NY Times Cooking – Vegan Chocolate Chip Banana Cake.

Ingredients

2 cups flour (I used a mix of spelt flour, white whole wheat flour and almond meal)
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
A couple pinches of salt
1 cup mashed bananas
1 cup canned coconut milk
1/2 cup coconut oil (unrefined, organic)
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 cup (cashews, dried cranberries, black raisins, cocoa nibs)

Method

  • In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and ginger.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk together bananas, coconut milk, oil, vinegar and vanilla.
  • Pour the wet mixture into the dry mixture and whisk until just combined. Fold in the dried fruit and nut and cocoa nibs mix. Stir well.
  • Preheat the oven to 350 F. Grease a loaf pan.
  • Spread the batter evenly into the prepared loaf pan. Bake for about 50 to 55 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean with a few crumbs clinging to it.
  • Transfer on to a cooling rack. Carefully turn it over, so the bottom does not get too moist.
  • Cut into wedges, enjoy.

Fresh Ginger Spice Cake

Fresh Ginger Spice Cake

Ginger is one of my favorite spices. I adore it in all forms. Fresh ginger is something I add to almost everything Indian I cook. Dal, khichdi, curries, soups… all of them get a generous addition of ginger – chopped or shredded. My daily cup of masala chai depends on fresh ginger for the zing and sharpness. Last India trip, I brought back to the U.S. a big knob of fragrant dried ginger (“chukkuh” in Malayalam). It liberally perfumed the plastic bag it came in. I add generous doses of dried ginger powder (“soonth”) to spice cookies and cakes. We are loyal consumers of all manner of herbal ginger teas (Yogi, Traditional Medicinals, Pukka, etc.)

I think I waited too long to make this cake, no?

Here is the original recipe. I have tweaked quantities and substituted ingredients in my version, so please read both recipes before you start baking!

Ingredients

80g fresh ginger, peeled
2/3 cup organic unsulphured molasses
1 cup raw cane sugar
1 cup olive oil
2 1/2 cups spelt flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 cup water
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 large eggs, at room temperature (I used Ener-G egg replacer)

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 350 F. Grease a loaf pan with oil or non-stick spray.
  • Chop the ginger finely. Or you can use a mixer/grinder to shred it finely.
  • Combine the shredded ginger, molasses, sugar and olive oil in a large bowl.
  • Mix the flour, cinnamon, cloves and black pepper in another bowl.
  • Bring the water to boil in a saucepan, add baking soda. Stir the water into the molasses mixture.
  • Incorporate the dry ingredients in to the molasses mixture.
  • Add the egg replacer to the batter. Mix well until combined thoroughly.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan. Bake for an hour until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. If the top of the cake starts browning before the cake is done, cover with a piece of aluminum foil and continue baking.
  • Let the cake cool for a good 30 minutes.
  • Cut into wedges, enjoy.

Notes

  • This cake is a beautiful blend of the sweet and spicy. The dark sweetness of the molasses perfectly complements the warm spices.
  • I used spelt flour in place of whole wheat flour.
  • The original recipe called for 120g of fresh ginger. However, the kind of fresh ginger we buy is very intense, so I reduced the quantity to 80g instead.
  • I used a loaf pan that was clearly the wrong size. The cake swelled up and started overflowing down the sides of the pan. The original recipe calls for a 9-inch springform pan or a 9inch x 3inch cake pan, neither of which I own. Well, the cake swelled like crazy, finally collapsing in the center. Next time, I will use a larger baking utensil.
  • I think this cake could benefit from the addition of dried cranberries and/or black raisins.